A warranty is a contract between car owners and the manufacturer that built your car. It promises to take care of any applicable repairs, provided that you maintain the vehicle to proper expectations. But like any contract, it can be broken if you don’t hold up your end of the bargain, so it is important to know what circumstances can void your warranty.

Edmunds.com says this,

“Environmental damage:

If your vehicle was damaged in a fire, flood, earthquake or any other environmental disaster, the automaker will not honor your warranty.”

Aftermarket parts or modifications:

This aspect of warranty coverage has a great deal of gray area. Although many dealers would have you think otherwise, simply having an aftermarket part or modifying your vehicle cannot void your warranty.

“Some dealerships may say, for example, that just because you have a performance part such as a cold air intake on the car that the whole vehicle warranty is void,” says Loren Wong, a car enthusiast and a former warranty administrator for BMW and Acura. “That’s not true,” he says.

The saving grace for consumers is the Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act of 1975. The Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act states that “a dealer must prove that aftermarket equipment caused the need for repairs before it can deny warranty coverage.”